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Paediatric Bone Rod

The Sydney Children’s Hospitals Network

Organ System:
  • Skeletal
Date Funded:
  • 29 August, 2014

Project summary

Revolutionary paediatric implant (SyMaxys) to treat children born with brittle bones or malformed leg.

What is the issue?

The SCHN is commercialising a revolutionary paediatric implant (SyMaxys) to treat children born with brittle bones or malformed legs. The technology, which was developed by Professor David Little and Dr Justin Bobin, addresses an unmet clinical need for fixation devices which grow with the child’s bone. The SyMaxys technology provides constant stability and support to the limb necessary for correcting the disorder, while accommodating bone growth. The novel design extends the life of the device and minimises the need for invasive replacement surgery.

The underlying technology is subject to patent applications, and will be applied to other conditions such as spinal disorders where both stability and movement are equally important.

What does the technology aim to do?

The SCHN is currently negotiating a licence agreement with a leading orthopaedics device company to complete the development and commercialisation of the device. Professor Little and his team will complete the development and testing of the SyMaxys device in NSW before seeking regulatory approval to start applying it in patients. They anticipate having the device available within three years, with the SCHN being the first to offer this device to its hospitals – Sydney Children’s Hospital, Randwick and The Children’s Hospital at Westmead.

The Kids Research Institute is a leading translation research centre for children, embedded in the Sydney Children’s Hospitals Network (SCHN) and located at The Children’s Hospital at Westmead. Our translational research provides patients and families early access to new and innovative treatments and improves the quality and efficiency of our clinical services.

The Orthopaedic Research and Biotechnology Unit, led by Professor David Little at the SCHN is focussed on advancing orthopaedic care through an improved understanding of bone diseases, advancing bone healing and development of orthopaedic implants. A pipeline of novel implantable devices is currently being developed.

Contact

Professor David Little, Paediatric Orthopaedic Surgeon, The Children’s Hospital at Westmead, Head of Orthopaedic Research and Biotechnology Unit, SCHN Professor of Paediatrics & Child Health

www.schn.health.nsw.gov.au

www.kidsresearch.org.au

Milestones